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The Regents Canal as it enter the River Thames.

Walk 1: The Regents Canal from Limehouse Basin to Little Venice.

The length of this walk was about 13.5miles however we made loads of detours so if you kept direct to the towpath then the distance would be about 8.8mile, a nice walk on the flat with zero hills .The start of the adventure put us into London on a very cold January morning, and we made our way by tube and DLR through to the station of Limehouse. A very short walk from the station will get you to the Limehouse Basin where the river Thames links the two together through a massive lock.

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LImehouse Basin
The Regents Canal is an 8.6 mile stretch that links the Paddington arm into the River Thames using the Limehouse Basin .
The Basin, built by the Regent's Canal Company, was formerly known as Regent's Canal Dock and was used by seagoing vessels and lighters to offload cargoes to canal barges, for onward transport along the Regent's Canal. Although initially a commercial failure following its opening in 1820, by the mid 19th century the dock (and the canal) were an enormous commercial success for the importance in the supply of coal to the numerous gasworks and latterly electricity generating stations along the canal, and for domestic and commercial use. At one point it was the principal entrance from the Thames to the entire national canal network. There is a nice Marina that lies behind the Locks so spend some time having a look around (please click this link for map info)
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Victoria Park.
From the lime house basin walk past the entrance to the Limehouse Cut this bit takes you to the River Lee, the canal path lies on the Northside of the basin the Regents canal. The canal first starts to go through Tower Hamlets past Mile end stadium and up into Victoria Park,
Victoria Park (known colloquially as Vicky Park or the People's Park)[1][2] is 86.18 hectares of open space [3] that opened in 1845. It stretches out across part of the East End of London, bordering parts of Bethnal Green, Hackney, and Bow, such as along Old Ford Road, London E3 and Victoria Park Road E9. You will then walk around near to Shoreditch park and the canal path will stop at the Islington Tunnel

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Victoria Park.
From the lime house basin walk past the entrance to the Limehouse Cut this bit takes you to the River Lee, the canal path lies on the Northside of the basin the Regents canal. The canal first starts to go through Tower Hamlets past Mile end stadium and up into Victoria Park,
Victoria Park (known colloquially as Vicky Park or the People's Park)[1][2] is 86.18 hectares of open space [3] that opened in 1845. It stretches out across part of the East End of London, bordering parts of Bethnal Green, Hackney, and Bow, such as along Old Ford Road, London E3 and Victoria Park Road E9. You will then walk around near to Shoreditch park and the canal path will stop at the Islington Tunnel
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Kings Cross & St Pancras Stations.

You will soon find yourself near London’s best station St Pancras so we had to make a detour and have a look in there, i have always wanted to visit it and you only will put a mile on the route so its no problem. St Pancras railway station, also known as London St Pancras and since 2007 as St Pancras International,[8][9][10] is a central London railway terminus and Grade I listed building located on Euston Road in the St Pancras area of the London Borough of Camden. It stands between theBritish Library, King's Cross station and the Regent's Canal and is a structure widely known for its Victorian architecture. It was opened in 1868 by theMidland Railway as the southern terminus of its mainline which connected London with the East Midlands and Yorkshire. When it opened, the arched Barlow train shed was the largest single-span roof in the world. Also near is Kings Cross station and a lot of building work is going on making the area look a lot more modern
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Camden Locks & Market.

You will soon come to the busiest part of the towpath, Camden lock, the place is full of people and food from all over the world can be found here. The locks where built around 1818 - 1820.
It is the only twin-lock remaining on the Canal, the remainder having been modified to single lock operation. The current locks are Grade II listed and replaced an innovative, but unsuccessful, hydropneumatic lock designed by William Congreve in an attempt to conserve water. A bit of the Towpath goes into the market and with 100,000 people there in a weekend things can get very crowded, you will find it impossible to move fast from this point just persevere and you will soon find the exit and peace again.
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Regents Park & The Zoo
Next point you will come to is alongside the great park with the Zoo on both your left & right sides. This bit of the walk lasts for some time and there are some great houses to view alongside the canal path. The Park itself is a Royal park and
In the Middle Ages the land was part of the manor of Tyburn, the property ofBarking Abbey. In the Dissolution of the Monasteries, Henry VIII appropriated the land, and it has been Crown property ever since, except for the period between 1649 and 1660. It was set aside as a hunting park, known as Marylebone Park, until 1649. In 1874 a massive explosion happened on this bit of the canal where five tones of gun power went up, the blast could be heard from 25 miles away and caused massive damage and no doubt scarred the animals in London Zoo
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Little Venice.
You will then come to the end of this trip through the leafy suburbs of Maida Vale and into little Venice, here the regents canal meets the Paddington Arm the next trip for us. We made a slight Detour here and visited the Paddington Basin the end point of the Paddington branch, this has been done up a lot and is a nice place to visit and we would have had to double back on this next time so we crossed it off our list. There are loads of little water front bars and cafes along little venice and it will be great in summer time. Little Venice is worth another trip and we will visit again in the summer time its just that it was so cold we were frozen. From the End of the Paddington basin you are within easy distance of Edgware Road Tube station, if you don’t want to walk towards the basin and remain in little Venice then Warwick Avenue tube is within easy distance.


This is a nice walk through some expensive real estate and you will find many things of interest along the route . You cannot get lost and you will find plenty of sign posts keeping you on the right track, it would be really nice on a fine spring morning but we need to get cracking this year on completing the whole thing.
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Flickr Photos (took some nice pictures click below for Album)

Urban Bridges

GPS data and Mapping