Canons Ashby

Canons Ashby & Gardens a National Trust House




We have visited this old place before however can find no log of it anywhere. This visit was done on a scorcher of a day so we took a picnic and drove along the back roads in Northamptonshire . You can visit the house on a timed ticket but are free to visit and walk along the gardens at your pleasure, there is also the Gift shop to help take cash from your pocket and also a nice Tea room.
From Wikipedia.
he house had been the home of the Dryden family since its construction in the 16th century; the manor house was built in approximately 1550 with additions in the 1590s, in the 1630s and 1710.
John Dryden had married Elizabeth Cope in 1551 and inherited, through his wife, an L-shaped farmhouse which he gradually extended. In the 1590s his son, Sir Erasmus Dryden completed the final north range of the house which enclosed the Pebble Courtyard.
The interior of the house is noted for its Elizabethan wall paintings and its Jacobean plasterwork. It has remained essentially unchanged since 1710 and is presented as it was during the time of Sir Henry Edward Leigh Dryden (1818–1899), a Victorian antiquary with an interest in history. His daughter, the historian and photographer Alice Dryden (1866–1956) was born in the house and lived there for 33 years. She moved away after her father died, since a woman could not inherit the estate and it went to her uncle, Sir Alfred Erasmus Dryden (1821–1912).[2]



Photos

:

Canons Ashby



Mapping

: