London Thames path

Chelsea Harbour to Wapping a ten mile walk following the Thames path 16th Jan 2016

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This route down the Thames proved to be one of the best London walks we have done to date, it takes in breathtaking views with lots of historic sites, we just wished it was a little warmer.

We set off on one of the coldest days of the winter so far. We wrapped up warm for this 9 mile trip following the river Thames path starting at Chelsea Harbour, the easiest way to get here is by the London Overground and head towards Imperial Wharf station. When built Chelsea Harbour was a coal yard used by the railways however it has changed dramatically over the years, this area has all been redeveloped and you will find property here costing £2m plus. You start the walk by going down Lots road where you will soon spot the unused power station that still stands there, built in 1905 with modern plans to redevelop this into shops and yet more apartments. We soon arrived at the first of our river crossings Battersea Bridge (opened 1890)
a five-span arch bridge with cast-iron girders and granite piers crossing the River Thames in London, England. It is situated on a sharp bend in the river, and links Battersea south of the river with Chelsea to the north. The bridge replaced a ferry service that had operated near the site since at least the middle of the 16th century.

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Battersea Park.
You will walk along the outside of Battersea park an 200 acre parkland that was marshland reclaimed from the Thames and land formerly used for market gardens. it was originally know as Battersea fields and was a spot for Duelling, On 21 March 1829, the Duke of Wellington and the Earl of Winchilsea met on Battersea fields to settle a matter of honour.[2] When it came time to fire, the Duke aimed his duelling pistol wide and Winchilsea fired his into the air. Winchilsea later wrote the Duke a grovelling apology

Battersea Power station.
we crossed the Chelsea bridge opened to the public in 1937 and we walked along the North side of the Thames, battersea power station soon comes into view on the other side. The station is now redundant generating power up unto 1983 however is still one of Londons most recognised landmarks. The station was the 4th largest brick building in Europe and was built in the Art Deco still of the day, it is now being redeveloped with offices and flats all going inside the old building. The route walks along Grosvenor road with Pimlico and Belgrave to the North before we crossed Vauxhall bridge, this bridge is Grade II listed it was opened to the public in 1906 and is nearly 810ft in length.

London Thames path

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Lambeth Palace.
the official London residence of the Archbishop of Canterbury in England, in north Lambeth, on the south bank of the River Thames, 400 m[1] south-east of the Palace of Westminster which has the Houses of Parliament on the opposite bank. The building – originally called the Manor of Lambeth or Lambeth House – has been the London residence of the Archbishop of Canterbury for nearly 800 years, whose original residence was in Canterbury, Kent.[2] It was acquired by the archbishopric around 1200 AD and has the largest collection of records of the church in its library. It is bounded by Lambeth Palace Road to the west and Lambeth Road to the south but unlike all surrounding land is excluded from the parish of North Lambeth. The garden park is listed and resembles Archbishop's Park, a neighbouring public park, however was a larger area with a notable orchard until the early 19th century. The former church in front of its entrance has been converted to the Garden Museum

We pass by Lambeth bridge, Westminster bridge along the south bank making our way pass the London eye and the hordes of tourists, then pass by Hungerford bridge with Charing cross station on the north side and Waterloo station on the south side. Pass the royal festival hall and waterloo bridge towards Blackfriars bridge, a 923ft span across the thames opened to the public in 1869. Most people know where to find HMS Belfast but just before you reach the old warship tucked away in Cathedral street you will find the Golden Hinde well a replica of it. Built in 1973 it is a full size replica
(launched 1577). She was built by traditional handcraft in Appledore, Torridge.[1] She has travelled more than 140,000 mi (230,000 km), a distance equal to more than five times around the globe. Like the original ship, she has circumnavigated the globe.

We finally reach Tower bridge and head over onto the north side, make sure you have a look in Katharine docks some of the boats are huge there is also a nice pub here called the Dickens inn. Heading east we finally arrive at our destination Wapping, this place has a very old maritime past and is filled with old warehouses. We shall have a look here again as we missed some interesting landmarks but it was getting cold so we decided to return home via Wapping overground station. A great walk iI would recommend to anybody, all on the flat with loads to see, we shall return!

Please click here for photos i took.

All the pictures were taken along the Thames, downloaded into Adobe lightroom then HDR in Photomatix Pro. please click to view Album in Flickr

Thames HDR